Candidate Information

 

2014 Local Election Candidate Information
(The 2014 Candidate Guide can be viewed at the following link:  2014 Candidate Guide)

Please view the 2014 REVISED Notice of Election 

Mayoral Candidates (1) to be elected:                      

Stacy Beamer

Peter Frinton (withdrawn as of October 16, 2014)

Tim Rhodes

Andrew Stone (Withdrawn as of October 28, 2014)

Murray Skeels

Councillor Candidates (6) to be elected:

Gary Ander

Michael Chapman

Sue Ellen Fast

Marcus Freeman

Yvette Gabrielle

Daron Jennings (withdrawn as of October 16, 2014)

Michael Kaile

Cro Lucas  (withdrawn as of October 16, 2014)

Melanie Mason

Alison Morse

Maureen Nicholson

Andrew Pietrow (withdrawn as of October 16, 2014)

Peter Williamson

George Zawadzki

 

Islands Trust Municipal Trustee Candidates (2) to be elected:

Michael Chapman

Sue Ellen Fast

Yvette Gabrielle 

Michael Kaile

Cro Lucas (withdrawn as of October 16, 2014)

Alison Morse

Maureen Nicholson

Andrew Stone (withdrawn as of October 28, 2014)

Peter Williamson

 

Qualifications for Office:  A person is qualified to be nominated, elected and to hold office as a member of the local government if they meet the following criteria;
-Canadian Citizen
-18 years of age or older;
-Resident of British Columbia for at least 6 months immediately before the day nomination papers are filed;
-Not disqualified by the Local Government Act or any other enactment from voting in an election in British Columbia or from being nominated for, being elected to, or holding office.

Frequently Asked Questions:

Candidate Eligibility
Can I run for local office?
To be an eligible candidate you must: 
•    be 18 years of age or older on general voting day; 
•    be a Canadian citizen; 
•    have lived in British Columbia for at least six months before filing your nomination documents; 
•    not be disqualified under the Local Government Act or any other enactment from being nominated for, being elected to or holding office, or be otherwise disqualified by law. 
You do not have to live or own property in the jurisdiction in which you are running for office.

For more information on candidate eligibility and requirements, contact the local Chief Election Officer or see the Candidate's Guide to Local Government Elections in B.C. (.PDF, 828KB).

Who is disqualified from running for local office?
A person is not eligible to run as a candidate for any local office if they: 
•    have been convicted of an indictable offence and are in custody;
•    are involuntarily confined to a psychiatric facility or other institution; 
•    are judges of the Provincial Court, Supreme Court or Court of Appeal; 
•    are employees or salaried officers of the local government, including volunteers who are paid for their services, unless they have taken a leave of absence and agree to resign if elected;
•    are federal employees unless they have prior approval from the Public Service Commission of Canada to run for office;
•    have been found guilty of an election offence, such as intimidation or buying votes, and are prohibited from holding office; or
•    have been disqualified for failing to: 
•    file a candidate disclosure statement in a previous election; 
•    make an oath of office; or, 
•    attend meetings for 60 consecutive days or four consecutive regularly scheduled meetings, without being granted permission by the municipal council or regional district board, unless the absence is due to illness or injury. 
Contact the local Chief Election Officer or see the Candidate's Guide to Local Government Elections in B.C. for more information on candidate eligibility and requirements.

Can I live in one local government jurisdiction and run in another? 
Yes. You do not have to live or own property in the jurisdiction in which you are running for office.

Contact the local Chief Election Officer or see the Candidate's Guide to Local Government Elections in B.C. (.PDF, 828KB) for more information on candidate eligibility and requirements.

Does employment affect my eligibility to be a candidate in a general local election?
Yes. As a local government employee or salaried officer, you may run in a general local election if you provide written notice to your employer and take a leave of absence starting that day or on the first day of the nomination process. You must also resign your employment if elected.

You must take a leave of absence and resign if elected if you are: 
•    an employee running for elected office in the municipality in which you are employed;
•    an employee seeking election as an electoral area director in the regional district of which your municipal employer is a member;
•    a regional district employee seeking to be elected as a mayor or councillor of a municipality that is a member of the regional district;
•    an employee of a municipality within the Islands Trust seeking to be elected as a local trustee; and,
•    an employee of the Islands Trust seeking to be elected as the mayor or councillor of any municipality in the Trust area.
Contact the local Chief Election Officer to discuss your eligibility.

If I am a federal public servant considering being a candidate for local office, do I need permission? 
Yes. You must obtain permission from the Public Service Commission of Canada (PSC) before seeking nomination as a candidate in a local government election or undertaking any candidacy-related activities.

Visit: www.psc-cfp.gc.ca/index-eng.htm under the "Political Activities" section. You can also contact the PSC at 1 866 707-7152, or by email at pa-ap@psc-cfp.gc.cc for more information.

Nominations

How many people do I need to nominate me as a candidate?


You must have a minimum of two eligible nominators from the local government jurisdiction in which you wish to run.

Local governments may require more than two eligible nominators - up to 10 nominators. 25 eligible nominators may be required in jurisdictions with more than 5,000 people.

Contact the local Chief Election Officer to determine the number of nominators required.

Do I have to pay a fee to be a candidate?


Local governments may require you to pay a refundable nomination deposit (maximum $100). These deposits are refunded when you file your candidate disclosure statement with Elections BC by the required deadline.

Contact the local Chief Election Office or school board administrator to see if a deposit is required.

Where can I get nomination documents?


Nomination packages are generally available from the local Chief Election Officer at the local government office during regular business hours two to four weeks before the nomination period begins.

Nomination packages are available throughout the nomination period, September 30 to October 10 for the 2014 general local election.

Where do I submit my nomination documents?


Your nomination documents must be submitted to the local Chief Election Officer or their designate by the close of nominations at 4:00 p.m. local time on October 10 for the 2014 general local election.

Can I file my nomination documents by fax or email?


Yes. Your nomination documents may be filed by fax or email during the nomination period. However, original copies of the documents must be submitted by 4:00 p.m. local time on October 17 for the 2014 general local election.

Can I fill out my nomination forms before the nomination period and have someone else submit them for me during the nomination period?
Yes. You can fill out the forms and make your solemn declaration before the nomination period and have someone else submit them to the local Chief Election Officer during the nomination period.

You must be available during the nomination period in case any changes to the forms are required by the local Chief Election Officer.

Where do I send nomination document updates? 


Any changes you make to your nomination documents after election results were declared must be sent directly to Elections BC.

Election results must be declared by November 19 for the 2014 general local election. Contact Elections BC at: in Victoria call: 250 387-5305; Elsewhere in B.C. call: 1 855 952-0280; Email address: electoral.finance@elections.bc.ca; Website: www.elections.bc.ca for information about nomination document updates.

How do I make a solemn declaration to be a candidate? 


You must make a solemn declaration that: 
•    you are qualified to run for office;
•    the information you provided on the nomination documents is true;
•    you will accept the office if elected; and,
•    you are aware of, understand the requirements and restrictions of the Local Elections Campaign Financing Act, and you intend to comply with the Act.

You can make the solemn declaration in advance with a Commissioner for Taking Affidavits in B.C. (e.g. lawyer or notary public) or before the local Chief Election Officer or designate when you deliver your nomination documents.

How many people can be nominated as candidates in a local election?
There is no set limit as to how many people can be nominated for local government office. Only eligible resident elector or non-resident property electors can nominate candidates in a local election.

Can the public look at my nomination documents?


Yes. The public can view a candidate's nomination documents at the local government offices during regular office hours from the time they were submitted to the local government until 30 days following the declaration of election results. A local government may also make nomination documents available at other locations or by other means, such as on its website.

Contact your local government to find out how nomination documents can be viewed by the public.

Can I decide I don't want to be a candidate after submitting my nomination papers?
Yes. You can withdraw from the election by notifying the local Chief Election Officer in writing. The withdrawl deadline for the 2014 general local election is 4:00 p.m. local time on October 17.

The Minister of Community, Sport and Cultural Development must approve any request for withdrawal after the October 17, 2014 deadline before the local Chief Election Officer can remove your name from the ballot.

Contact the local Chief Election Officer for further information about withdrawing a nomination.

Election Campaigns & Advertsing

What is the campaign period?


The campaign period for a general local election begins at the start of the calendar year in which the general local election is held and ends at the close of voting on general voting day.

The campaign period runs from January 1 to November 15 for the 2014 general local election.

Contact Elections BC at: in Victoria call: 250 387-5305; Elsewhere in B.C. call: 1 855 952-0280; Email address: electoral.finance@elections.bc.ca; Website: www.elections.bc.ca for more information about the campaign period.

What is the election proceedings period?


The election proceedings period runs from September 30 to November 15 for the 2014 general local election.

Rules in relation to election advertising and third party advertising as defined in the Local Elections Campaign Financing Act come into effect during this period.

Contact Elections BC at: in Victoria call: 250 387-5305; Elsewhere in B.C. call: 1 855 952-0280; Email address: electoral.finance@elections.bc.ca; Website: www.elections.bc.ca for more information about the election proceedings period.

When can I start campaigning?


You can begin election campaigning as soon as you choose to do so. However all campaign contributions and election expenses must be recorded in relation to a particular election.

See Elections BC's Guide to Local Elections Campaign Financing in B.C. and Third Party Sponsor Guide to Local Elections in B.C. available online at: www.elections.bc.ca for more information about campaign period and election proceedings period requirements.

Can I request a copy of the voter's list to use for my campaign?

Yes. Each candidate is entitled to one free copy of a list of registered electors (voter's list) if one is used by the local government.

You must agree in writing that the voter's list will only be used for the purposes of the election before receiving the list.

The voter's list may only be used for election campaign-related purposes, e.g. door-knocking, flyer distribution, calling eligible voters to remind them to vote. You must use the voter's list carefully given the information it contains. The list must be returned to the local government or destroyed following the general local election. 

Are there rules about signs in local elections?


Candidates must comply with the legislated election advertising under the Local Elections Campaign Financing Act during the election proceedings period (September 30 to November 15, 2014).

Campaign signs or materials are prohibited within 100 metres of any voting place. This includes buttons worn by supporters, bumper stickers, pamphlets, posters, or any other material that advocates for or against a particular candidate(s). Local election officials have authority to remove any signs or campaign materials found within 100 metres of a voting place on a voting day.

Most local governments have bylaws governing the placement of signs, including election signs, within their jurisdiction. Contact your local government for more information.

The Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure has authority over provincial roads and highways, and may have rules regarding the placement of signs adjacent to these roads and highways.

See Elections BC's Guide to Local Elections Campaign Financing in B.C. and Third Party Sponsor Guide to Local Elections in B.C. available online at: www.elections.bc.ca for more information. 

What information is now required on my signs and advertising?
Contact Elections BC at: in Victoria call: 250 387-5305; Elsewhere in B.C. call: 1 855 952-0280; Email address: electoral.finance@elections.bc.ca; Website: www.elections.bc.ca for information about signs and advertising requirements during the election proceedings period (September 30 to November 15, 2014). 

Can I set up and use a web site as part of my election campaign?
Yes. You can use a website during an election campaign; however, any expenses related to setting up and operating the web site must be recorded and disclosed on your candidate disclosure statement.

Contact Elections BC at: in Victoria call: 250 387-5305; Elsewhere in B.C. call: 1 855 952-0280; Email address: electoral.finance@elections.bc.ca; Website: www.elections.bc.ca for information about election advertising during the election proceedings period. 

Can I use YouTube, Twitter and Facebook as part of my election campaign?
Yes. You can use social media during an election campaign.

Any expenses related to setting up and operating a social media campaign must be recorded and disclosed as part of your candidate disclosure statement.

Contact Elections BC at: in Victoria call: 250 387-5305; Elsewhere in B.C. call: 1 855 952-0280; Email address: electoral.finance@elections.bc.ca; Website: www.elections.bc.ca for information about election advertising during the election proceedings period. 

Can I advertise on general voting day?

No. Broadcast (television, radio) and print (newspapers, magazines) advertising are prohibited on general voting day. Be sure that your ad does not appear on general voting day if you advertise in a weekly newspaper that is distributed on a Saturday. 


Who do I contact for information about election advertising?


Contact Elections BC at: in Victoria call: 250 387-5305; Elsewhere in B.C. call: 1 855 952-0280; Email address: electoral.finance@elections.bc.ca; Website: www.elections.bc.ca for information about election advertising. 


Who do I contact for information about campaign financing?
Contact Elections BC at: in Victoria call: 250 387-5305; Elsewhere in B.C. call: 1 855 952-0280; Email address: electoral.finance@elections.bc.ca; Website: www.elections.bc.ca for information about campaign financing.

 

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